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Phrases related to: break new ground

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rumor increbrescita report, an impression is gaining ground.Rate it:

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rust outTo rust completely; to become covered in rust; by extension, to break down over time and cease working.Rate it:

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se changer les idéesto start a new activity in order to change one's state of mind, to take a break from doing something boring or to escape from a displeasing situation.Rate it:

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set downSimple sum of parts set + down, to place, especially on the ground or a surface; to cease carrying.Rate it:

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settle downto get comfortable with one's new accommodation or circumstances.Rate it:

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settle inTo get comfortable or established, as in a new place.Rate it:

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signa convellere (vid. sect. XVI. 6, note signa...)to pluck up the standards out of the ground (to begin the march).Rate it:

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signa ferre, tollereto begin the march, break up the camp.Rate it:

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smash downTo cause to fall down and break by hitting it hard.Rate it:

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softroader. This involves increased ground clearance with tyre, wheel, and suspension tweaks, skid plates and refers to mini SUV or wagons.Rate it:

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souhaiter la bonne année à quelqu’unTo wish some one a happy new year.Rate it:

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spick-and-spanClean, spotless; original sense "like new".Rate it:

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spring outTo break out; to escape.Rate it:

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staff upTo hire new staff; to fill vacancies in a workforce.Rate it:

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stay tunedTo wait or remain alert (for new developments or for further information).Rate it:

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step on a rakeTo step on the tines of a garden rake, causing the handle of the rake to rise from the ground rapidly, invariably striking the person walking in the face.Rate it:

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Stick-in-the-MudA person with old outdated and orthodox ideas who does not like to accept change, unable to cope up or except something new and modernRate it:

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stop the pressesAn imperative form used to introduce especially new, important, surprising, or recent developments.Rate it:

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strike out into unknown territoryVenture forth into a new or unknown business, theme, vacation, personal relationship or program.Rate it:

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stuffPaper stock ground ready for use. When partly ground, it is called half stuff.Rate it:

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sunder outTo break out; divide or scatter about.Rate it:

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s’agenouiller à cruTo kneel on the bare ground, on the cold stone (without a hassock or carpet).Rate it:

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take fiveTo break something up.Rate it:

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take fiveTo take a five-minute break from some activity, take a short break from some activity.Rate it:

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take guard(For a new batsman, with help from the umpire) to mark a point on the popping crease in front of his wicket so that he knows where it is behind him; to guard.Rate it:

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take offTo leave the ground and begin flight; to ascend into the air.Rate it:

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tear alongTo break something into two pieces by separating at a line of perforations.Rate it:

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teething troublesSmall problems such as are to be expected with some any new and untried system or product.Rate it:

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the bronxnew york boroughRate it:

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think on one's feetWhen one is in the middle of a process, activity, or conversation, to adjust rapidly, effectively, and intelligently to new developments or changing circumstances.Rate it:

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third handNot new, having more than one previous owner.Rate it:

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throw in at the deep endTo introduce a person to a new situation without adequately preparing him or her.Rate it:

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to disassembleTo break bondsRate it:

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tomorrow is another dayTomorrow will bring new opportunities and a fresh start for one's endeavors.1600, author unknown, "Phillidaes Love-call to her Coridon, and his replying" (song), in England's Helicon, printed at London by I.R. for John Flasket:Phil. Yonder comes my Mother, Coridon,whether shall I flie?Cor. Under yonder Beech my lovely one,while she passeth by.Say to her thy true-Love was not heere,remember, remember,to morrow is another day:1896, Amelia E. Barr, A Knight of the Nets, ch. 8:"Well, well, my dear lass, to-night we cannot work, but we may sleep. . . . Keep a still heart tonight, and tomorrow is another day."1936, Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind, ch. 63:"Tomorrow, I'll think of some way to get him back. After all, tomorrow is another day."2005, Fran Schumer, "JERSEY: In Princeton, Taking On Harvard's Fuss About Women," New York Times, 19 June (retrieved 18 Aug. 2009):"Half of me is depressedRate it:

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top edgeThe edge of a bat farthest from the ground.Rate it:

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tout battant neufAll brand new.Rate it:

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trade into give a piece of merchandise as part of the payment or trade for something new.Rate it:

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TTTOInitialism of to the tune of : indicating the piece whose melody is borrowed for a new song.Rate it:

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tune in, turn on, drop outPay attention to the new way of living; take drugs; abandon the established ways.Rate it:

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turn the pageTo move on to new involvements or activities; to make a fresh start.Rate it:

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versurā solvere, dissolvere (Att. 5. 15. 2)to pay one's old debts by making new.Rate it:

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votre rival vous coupera l’herbe sous le piedYour rival will cut you out, will take the wind out of your sails, will cut the ground from under your feet.Rate it:

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walk the dogperform a trick where the yo-yo rolls on the ground, attached to the stringRate it:

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was gibt's Neueswhat's newRate it:

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welcome to my worldIndicates that the speaker is very experienced with a situation that is new to the interlocutor.Rate it:

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wet behind the earsInexperienced; not seasoned; new; just beginning.Rate it:

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whole clothSomething made completely new, with no history, and not based on anything else.Rate it:

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work around the clockTo work all day and all night without a break, because it is imperative to finish something.Rate it:

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worm's-eye viewA view of an object from below, from the ground.Rate it:

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you're never too old to learnIt is possible to learn new things, at any age; (implying) follow your desires and dreamsRate it:

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