a rhyming expression for saying something is very easy, straight forward; also written easy-peasy; See also: piece of cake; a walk in the park; as easy as falling off a log; easy as pie

Etymology:

  • Easy peasy lemon squeezy is an elaboration on easy-peasy, likewise meaning “extremely easy or simple.” One of the earliest documented instances of easy-peasy appears in the 1940 American film The Long Voyage Home, used to advise a character to handle a suspicious box with care. The film takes place on a British steamship, a setting that accords with the Oxford English Dictionary’s estimation that easy-peasy originates as a British colloquialism or children’s slang.
  • The peasy in easy-peasy is an instance of rhyming reduplication, a term best illustrated with some of English’s many other examples: freaky-deaky, razzle-dazzle, super-duper, teenie-weenie, to name a mere few.
  • As for lemon squeezy? The origin of this vivid part of the expression is the subject of much speculation. It’s popularly said that easy peasy lemon squeezy comes from a 1950–60s commercial slogan for a British dish soap called Sqezy, which was lemon-scented and packaged in a squeeze bottle. But while there was a product called Sqezy (pronounced like squeezy), there is currently no firm evidence the brand ever used easy peasy lemon squeezy as a catchphrase. Also alluding to the detergent, another theory anecdotally claims the expression goes back to a racially charged British schoolyard chant, “Easy, peasy, Japanesey. Wash your bum in lemon Sqezy.”
  • Easy peasy Japanesey points to other elaborations on easy-peasy such as easy peasy pumpkin peasy and easy, peasy weasy, the latter used a 1973 British short story, nearly 20 years before the OED cites easy peasy lemon squeezy, in a 1990 article in the Independent.
  • While its exact origins are unknown, easy peasy lemon squeezy has been featured prominently in some popular media, including the 2002 British-parodying comedy, Austin Powers in Goldmember. And in the hit television series The Walking Dead, the brutal villain Negan notably utters the expression after offing a zombie—making the sweet and innocent expression sound very sinister. Source: https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/easy-peasy-lemon-squeezy/
0 Views

See? Once you know your times tables, math is easy peasy

Submitted by TriplePurple on April 22, 2024

Translation

Find a translation for the easy peasy (lemon squeezy) phrase in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Nearby phrases

Some more phrases from our dictionary similar to easy peasy (lemon squeezy)

How to pronounce this phrase?

Discuss this easy peasy (lemon squeezy) phrase with the community:

0 Comments

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this easy peasy (lemon squeezy) definition to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "easy peasy (lemon squeezy)." Phrases.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 25 May 2024. <https://www.phrases.com/phrase/easy-peasy-(lemon-squeezy)_64284>.

    We need you!

    Help us build the largest human-edited phrases collection on the web!

    Quiz

    Are you a phrases master?

    »
    Go big or go ___________.
    A out
    B home
    C again
    D abroad

    Browse Phrases.com