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Phrases related to: go after

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pay upTo pay for something in total, after a certain amount of time after receiving a purchase.Rate it:

(5.00 / 5 votes)
take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselvesIf you take care of little things one at a time, they can add up to big things.1750, Chesterfield, letter 5 Feb. (1932) IV. 1500:Old Mr. Lowndes, the famous Secretary of the Treasury, ?used to say?Take care of the pence, and the pounds will take care of themselves.1912, G. B. Shaw, Pygmalion ii. 132:Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.1979, R. Cassilis, Arrow of God, iv. xvii.:Little things, Master Mally. Look after the pennies, Master Mally, and the pounds will look after themselves.1999, Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
after the factToo late; after something is finished or final.Rate it:

(4.00 / 1 vote)
on a full stomachDirectly after eating, after a meal.Rate it:

(3.50 / 2 votes)
after the Lord Mayor's showSaid of a disappointing or mundane event occurring straight after an exciting, magnificent, or triumphal event.Rate it:

(3.33 / 3 votes)
if it's yellow let it mellow, if it's brown flush it downIn order to save water, only flush the toilet after defecation, not after urination.Rate it:

(1.00 / 1 vote)
Light at the End of the TunnelSuccess achieved after taxing effort, to finally get the answer after prolonged researchRate it:

(1.00 / 1 vote)
after Saturday comes SundayUsed other than as an idiom: see after, Saturday, comes, Sunday.Rate it:

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après skiA place "after skiing". Typically a bar or pub where people go after a day on the slopes to ease off and meet other people.Rate it:

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après-skiA place "after skiing". Typically a bar or pub where people go after a day on the slopes to ease off and meet other people.Rate it:

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put that in your pipe and smoke itUsed after stating something surprising or undesired, to emphasize its truth. Also used after refuting an argument. Sometimes an adjective is inserted before pipe.Rate it:

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that's a loaded questionAsked My partner if he wasn’t sexually attracted to me anymore since it’s been 3 months after getting back together after a breakup initially by him and no sexual experience in a total of 6 months.Rate it:

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15 minutes of fameA very short time in the spotlight or brief flurry with fame, after which the person or subject involved is quickly forgotten.Rate it:

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a carpet-baggerA candidate for election who has no roots or interest in the constituency he wishes to represent. The original meaning was a Unionist financier or adventurer who exploited the cheap labour in the American South after the Civil War. The carpet bags carried by these adventurers were made of carpet material.Rate it:

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a man/woman after your own hearta man or woman who likes the same things or has the same opinions as youRate it:

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a pyrrhic victoryAn apparent victory, but one which is no victory at all, due to the great cost incurred. The phrase comes from the victory won by King Pyrrhus at Asculum in 279BC which cost him many of his best men. After the battle Pyrrhus remarked: "One more such victory and we are finished."Rate it:

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after Saturday comes SundayA phrase sometimes attributed to fundamentalist Muslims, implying that they wish to kill the Jews, whose sabbath is Saturday, and then the Christians, whose sabbath is Sunday.Rate it:

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buy the rumor, sell the factA phrase often cited by stock traders that explains price declines that occur after an anticipated positive event has happened.Rate it:

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can't put the words back into one's mouth fast enoughThis phrase is often said after someone said something they shouldn't have said as a way of conveying regret for having said it.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
ce n'est pas la mer à boireIt is not an impossibility; It is not so very difficult after all.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
chip off the old blockSomeone who takes after their parent.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
circle backTo revisit a topic, concept or idea after having put it on the back burner; to return to a place or locationRate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
de tanto aprontar, hoje conheço as artimanhas de quem pensa em me enganar.For those who want to fool me, I've learned how to behave after make a lot of bad things.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
dead lastThe standings, often by a considerable margin to the next-to-last-place finisher or after an exceptionally poor showing or season.Rate it:

(5.00 / 2 votes)
ever afterforever, for eternityRate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
first port of callThe first port that a vessel calls in at after the start of a voyage.Rate it:

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flutter in the dovecoteI further argued that the principal cause for the political deadlock that persisted for thirty years after the guns fell silent was Israeli intransigence rather than Arab intransigence. The appearance of the first wave of revisionist studies excited a great deal of interest and controversy in the media and more than a flutter in the academic dovecote. — Israel Confronts Its Past.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
FortnightOilA Specially Refined Lantern-oil for the Switchman's Signal Lanterns used on the Grand Trunk Railroad. 'Topped-Off' Lanterns generally required refilling after a 'fortnight' of duty time. (Conjecture)Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
get the dirty water off one's chestTo get sexual satisfaction, especially after a period of abstinence.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
go from zero to heroTo become very popular after being unpopular.Rate it:

(5.00 / 2 votes)
go in offTo pot the cue ball accidentally after hitting the object ball.Rate it:

(5.00 / 6 votes)
hesiod says: even a fool after suffering gets him knowledge; the italians: can scotato da l'acqua calda ha paura poi della freddaA dog burnt by hot water afterwards fears cold.]Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
I can't find my ...Said after losing something.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
it was worth itit deserved it The phrase "it was worth it" is a common expression used to indicate that the effort, time, or cost of something was justified by the outcome or result. It suggests that the benefits or rewards of an experience, action, or decision outweighed the challenges or sacrifices involved. The phrase is often used to express satisfaction, contentment, or a sense of accomplishment after completing a challenging task, achieving a goal, or experiencing a positive outcome. For example, someone who has just finished a difficult workout might say, "It was worth it. I feel great!" Or, a traveler who has just returned from an amazing trip might say, "It was worth it, even though it was expensive." The phrase can also be used to justify or defend a decision that may have negative consequences or be seen as controversial. For example, a business owner who has just taken a significant financial risk might say, "It was worth it in the end. We've seen a significant increase in revenue." Overall, the phrase "it was worth it" suggests that the rewards or benefits of an experience, action, or decision outweighed the challenges or sacrifices involved. It is often used to express satisfaction, contentment, or a sense of accomplishment, and it can also be used to justify or defend a decision.Rate it:

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just sayingUsed after informing somebody of something that may be offensive to try and soften the blowRate it:

(5.00 / 2 votes)
light at the end of the tunnelA better situation after long hardship.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
ODTAAone damn thing after anotherRate it:

(5.00 / 3 votes)
pay it forwardPerforming a selfless act of kindness (normally for a random stranger) after having been the beneficiary of such an act oneself - the mentality behind which is to make kindness contagious such that it multiplies exponentiallyRate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
pick up the piecesTo restore one's life (or a given situation etc.) to a normal state, after a calamity, shock etc.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
rise from the ashesTo make a comeback after a long hiatus. To come back into common use or practice. To come back into popularity. To come back to being a thing of today.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
see starsTo experience apparent flashing lights in one's field of vision, especially after receiving a blow to the head.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
seven outin the game of craps, to roll a seven after having established the "point"Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
snake eyesTwo ones, after rolling two dice.Rate it:

(5.00 / 1 vote)
look afterTo watch or protect; to keep safe.Rate it:

(4.75 / 8 votes)
ע״הOn whom should be peace; used after the name of a dead person.Rate it:

(4.50 / 2 votes)
safe and soundHaving come to no harm, especially after being exposed to danger.Rate it:

(4.33 / 3 votes)
at lastAfter a long time; eventually.Rate it:

(4.00 / 2 votes)
be afterTo try to obtain.Rate it:

(4.00 / 2 votes)
Between a Rock and a Hard PlaceTo face a difficult situation and remain in a tight spot one after another, Or face some difficulty in making the right decision that would deliver no harmRate it:

(4.00 / 1 vote)
carry a torch forTo harbor feelings of love despite not being in a relationship; generally unrequited or after a relationship has ended, and sometimes implying secret feelings. There is the implication of keeping hope alive.Rate it:

(4.00 / 3 votes)

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